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Observed patterns of classroom interactions and teacher wellbeing in lower secondary school

In this study, we aimed to identify variations in the quality of classroom experiences in Norwegian schools through classroom observations using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) and to explore how teachers job satisfaction and well-being are associated to patterns of classroom interactions.

Teacher and students interacting in classroom. Photo: iStock Photo: iStock

Professionals, researchers, and policy-makers worldwide agree on the importance of providing high quality teaching as a protective intervention for to all students, especially those in risk of school failure. The study draw on the Teaching through interaction (TTI) framework develop by Robert Pianta, Bridget Hamre and colleagues at the University of Virginia. TTI is a theoretically based and empirically evidenced framework for conceptualizing and measuring teacher-student patterns of classroom interaction. In line with TTI the quality of teaching is understood in terms of teachers’ emotional support, classroom organisation and instructional support.

In this study, we aimed to identify variations in the quality of classroom experiences in Norwegian schools through classroom observations using Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) and to explore how teachers job satisfaction and well-being are associated to patterns of classroom interactions.

Classroom observations using the secondary version of  the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS-S) and teacher self-reports were used to examine the relationships between patterns of teacher–student interactions and the wellbeing of Norwegian lower secondary school teachers.

Latent profile analysis identified four subgroups. Teacher–student interactions and the teachers' wellbeing were inter-related in that teachers who were observed to be high in all the interaction domains (Emotional Support, Classroom Organization, and Instructional Support) perceived themselves as having high job satisfaction. The results showed that improving teachers’ wellbeing has the potential to improve teacher–student interactions and vice versa. The study also discusses the use of classroom observations to facilitate teacher–student interactions in teacher training.

Full reference:

Virtanen, T., Vaaland, G.S. & Ertesvåg, S.K. (2019) Associations between observed patterns of classroom interactions and teacher wellbeing in lower secondary school. Teaching and Teacher Education.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0742051X18301975